Our view

A

lthough our nation has overcome much strive and struggle, it never been more clear we still have much more to conquer.

 Martin Luther King Jr. urged civil disobedience as a form of protest and helped African Americans throughout the country gain any number of rights and equalities.

Rev. King once told us, “Human progress is neither automatic nor inevitable ... Every step toward the goal of justice requires sacrifice, suffering, and struggle; the tireless exertions and passionate concern of dedicated individuals.”

The journey is not complete for any of us, regardless of color. We will likely continue to run into injustices, both personal and broad, that must be undone either individually or collectively. Even when the individual faces his or her own personal injustice, it behooves each of us to step into the fray and fight for what is right, fight for justice.

King could foresee our continued struggle. We should collectively celebrate his foresight and his longing for what is right and remember his words:

“Man must evolve for all human conflict a method which rejects revenge, aggression and retaliation. The foundation of such a method is love.”

We may not have all the answers or be able to solve the nation’s injustices in a matter of days, but what we can do is spread love. It’s not hard and it’s something everyone can do — be kind to your neighbors, no matter their color, and fight for those who don’t look like you.  

We have to steal a lyric from our hometown boys, The Wilson Brothers Band, and say, “a little love goes a long, long way.” 

That’s one thing we know. Let’s get out there and spread some love.