Before increasing gas tax, look elsewhere for funds

Dear Editor, In response to Gov. Kay Ivey’s tax proposal, I say no. It doesn’t matter the tax hasn’t been increased since 1992. Little has been done since then to roads in the area. Many of the same roads receive attention and ones in dire need are untouched. I understand there are grants and provisions […]

Dear Editor,

In response to Gov. Kay Ivey’s tax proposal, I say no. It doesn’t matter the tax hasn’t been increased since 1992. Little has been done since then to roads in the area. Many of the same roads receive attention and ones in dire need are untouched. I understand there are grants and provisions for certain state roads and highways, but I would demand local side streets are the prime expenditure if this proposal passes.

A true example side roads have not been maintained, DeJarnette Road that connects Pearson Chapel to North Central (a highly trafficked road) has not been paved/blacktopped I don’t believe in my 31 years of existence. It is continually patched with gravel and as busy as this street is, the gravel doesn’t even have time to settle and it is a temporary fix before the road returns to that of horse and buggy feel.

My vote is for legislators to reevaluate infrastructure budgets where the funds are allotted based on the number of miles in a district rather than the same amount for each district. My county commissioner shared with me the reason my road had not been paved is because he had 200-plus miles to maintain and had the same budget as another district that had only 30 miles to maintain. Doesn’t sound very fair, does it?

So before we just increase taxes because that’s the thing to do, I ask for evaluation of budget, allot finances fairly based on need and amount of maintenance, and spend more to have quality fixes versus temporary patches.

Seth Fuller

Kellyton