The Big Ten Conference has now decided to consider reversing course on its decision to cancel fall football. Turns out, their powers ­– that – be have been convinced maybe, just maybe, they acted somewhat hastily.

Nothing is official, but there was a new narrative tossed out into the Twitter-verse regarding the Big Ten’s potential change of heart: The idea the ACC, SEC, and Big 12 should now all met the Big Ten in the middle and have everyone start the season in late November.

The collective reaction by most fans to this proposition mirrored my own: “Nah bruh… We good.”

Would the college football season be better with the likes of Ohio State, Michigan and Penn State involved? Of course it would. But their conference made an ill-advised power-play. In what was meant to be a show of its strength, the Big Ten actually only exposed its lack of leadership when it surprisingly called off the 2020 season. That conference erroneously assumed the other four bigtime conferences would follow suit like the good l’il lapdogs the Big Ten thought they were.

As it turns out, the Big Ten didn’t have as much pull as it thought. The ACC, SEC and Big 12 have simply moved forward without them. And while there are no guarantees of a football season in the COVID-era, those three conferences are preparing every day to put a product on the field. There will certainly be major obstacles — see Auburn’s cancellation of several practices last week — but those obstacles are simply a part of everyday life in 2020.

The high school football season is now two weeks old and the NFL season is two weeks away. Why should anyone believe college football can’t be pulled off too? Yes, there will be fewer people in the stands than subscribers to my OnlyFans.com page, but I think I speak for everyone when we say we just want to see the sport we love. (By the way… I am just kidding… I don’t have an OnlyFans.com page…. Unless you guys want me to make one? I mean, I could use the money!.... Any takers?.... No?.... Well, that’s probably for the best anyway).

My point is if the Big Ten does in fact want to play in 2020, they need to do so on the ACC, SEC and Big 12’s terms. Those aren’t super-special terms mind you; just the terms those three decided to move forward with during the pandemic. Play 10 games, start sometime in September, etc.

If the Big Ten cannot adhere to those standard rules, maybe they should take the year off after all. Use that time to reflect and possibly find some new leadership.

Luke Robinson is a regular columnist, contributor to BMetro, AHSAA Radio Network Broadcaster and Sportzblitz Team Member.