Gregg Granville

Siri Hedreen / The Outlook

Prison guard Gregg Granville reacts to the aftermath unfolding on TV behind the bar at Fermenter's Market On The Green.

In local bars, Mexican restaurants and social media, Tallapoosa County residents reacted in horror, indignation, and for some, literal disbelief Wednesday as a pro-Trump mob storming the Capitol building played out on live television.

"I was shocked and horrified to see our nation's Capitol literally under siege by domestic terrorists," Alexander City resident Louann Cooley Moseley said. "How could this happen in the greatest democracy the world has ever seen? To see the Confederate flag being paraded around inside the Capitol building — that was one of the most shocking and disturbing images of the day."

In local bars, Mexican restaurants and social media, Tallapoosa County residents reacted in horror, indignation, and for some, literal disbelief Wednesday as a pro-Trump mob storming the Capitol building played out on live television.

The Capitol building was put into lockdown Wednesday as a mob stormed the grounds and legislative chamber, following a speech from President Trump in which the president told supporters "We will never concede."

The lockdown occurred as legislators began debating the certification of President-elect Joe Biden's electoral college victory. Congress later confirmed Biden's election Thursday morning.

Dadeville resident Corey Barrett, a former Republican who left the party when Trump won the nomination, described Wednesday as "one of the saddest days in our history."

"It was the most shameful display we've seen from a political party in decades and sadly, the warning signs this was coming were ignored or downplayed," Barrett said.

Both Moseley and Barrett were convinced of the president's role.

"What's really sad and gut-wrenching is that this was incited, encouraged, and praised by the sitting president of the United States," Moseley said. "Even sadder, those domestic terrorists did what they did based on a pack of lies their own president told them about the election."

Barrett said Trump has turned the Republican party into a "cult."  

"They've sold out their principles and beliefs for a conman that preached such hateful rhetoric filled with easily disproven lies that they turned on their country, stormed our Capitol, attacked our police and sadly cost a young woman her life," he said.

Not everyone was convinced yesterday's mob was made up of Trump supporters. Prison guard Gregg Granville watched the aftermath unfold on Fox News Wednesday evening at Fermenter's Market On The Green in Alex City.

While he voted for Obama in 2008, Granville describes himself as a conservative. 

"These people are doing nothing, I mean, you can see it," Granville said. "They're just, I guess — what do you call that — coagulating," he said, referring to the crowd milling around on TV.

In regards to the earlier forced entry into the Capitol building, Granville said he did not believe they were pro-Trump.

"That's not a Trump supporter doing that right there, my friend," he said. "That is somebody hired to do that. They're young college kids; I swear to God they're not Trump supporters. I could almost put my life on it."

Moseley reacted with a different kind of disbelief.

"Even today I find it hard to believe it actually happened," she said. "I'm still shaken from it."