Dadeville’s lower crime rates due to progressive policing, citizen involvement, chief says

Recently released statistics show there were no reported homicides in the city of Dadeville last year and police chief David Barbour said crime rates were lower from 2017 to 2018. The Dadeville Police Department’s crime report for 2018 was made through Uniform Crime Report from the state, according to Barbour. He said he did not […]

Recently released statistics show there were no reported homicides in the city of Dadeville last year and police chief David Barbour said crime rates were lower from 2017 to 2018.

The Dadeville Police Department’s crime report for 2018 was made through Uniform Crime Report from the state, according to Barbour. He said he did not have 2017 statistics to directly compare the numbers.

There were 54 reported aggravated assaults, 97 assaults and 23 burglaries in 2018, according to the report. The report states five of the assaults and three of the burglaries were unfounded — meaning there wasn’t enough evidence to pursue a change.

There were 104 drug crimes reported last year, according to the report. Barbour said most of the drug cases get passed along to the Tallapoosa County Narcotics Task Force, which has a few Dadeville officers.

There were 22 fraud cases reported last year, according to the report.

“That could be anywhere from forged checks, passed forged checks or counterfeit money and that falls under that same criteria, such as criminal possession of a forged instrument first degree,” Barbour said.

There are two cleared cases for kidnapping but Barbour said that statistic is incorrect and no kidnappings occurred. He said he needs the database where the police department got the report to be corrected.

“I don’t know how they came up with kidnapping because I know we didn’t have any kidnappings,” Barbour said.

There are 210 cases for other crimes, which Barbour said are calls for anything from disorderly conduct to noise complaints and nuisance properties.

Barbour said he believes the crime rate is lower due to progressive policing and the department’s relationship with its citizens.

“What they see, they report to us and that certainly puts a curtail on a lot of stuff,” Barbour said. “The task force has done an outstanding job of working this area as well, so that has curtailed some of it as well.”

Barbour said the DPD has 13 officers and two rookies who are about to start the police academy at the end of the month.

Barbour said the one of the department’s goals for this year is to further lower the crime rates.

“Our goals are to maintain our full staff and get more interaction with the public, which we do a good job of doing that now, but I need to see it be better and us curtail crime in their neighborhoods,” Barbour said.

Barbour said residents should be aware of their surroundings and scams occurring.

“Be careful what you post on social media about (your) personal lives and all that because when I look at it, that means everybody is looking at it and that sort of leaves everybody (vulnerable to crime),” Barbour said.