court

Amy Clampitt pleaded guilty to possession of a controlled substance and was sentenced to 36 months in prison Monday before Tallapoosa County District Court Judge Kim Taylor.

Amy Clampitt pleaded guilty to possession of a controlled substance and was sentenced to 36 months in prison Monday before Tallapoosa County District Court Judge Kim Taylor.

Clampitt was found in possession of methamphetamines during a break in her manslaughter trial in June.

“She was arrested during a traffic stop,” Dadeville police chief David Barbour said hours after Clampitt’s arrest in June. “While running her license it was discovered she had child support warrants from Clay County.”

Law enforcement said a male walked away from the scene as Clampitt was arrested. 

Fifth Judicial Circuit District Attorney Jeremy Duerr said traces of methamphetamines were found on foil as the vehicle was inventoried and seized.

Clampitt pleaded guilty to information Monday before her case could be presented to a grand jury and before it could be tried before a jury of her peers. The 36-month sentence will be served concurrent with Clampitt’s 40-year sentence for the manslaughter of her boyfriend Jimmy Dugan.

Clampitt ran from a law enforcement officer who was trying to perform a traffic stop for speeding and a broken taillight leading to the 2017 manslaughter charge. Testimony at Clampitt’s manslaughter trial told of her driving at speeds at 90 mph and faster in a 45 mph zone before losing control at the intersection of Concord Road and Highway 49 north of Dadeville Dugan died in the wreck.

Clampitt said at her manslaughter sentencing last month she had a problem with drugs.

“I stand before you here today begging for your understanding and mercy,” Clampitt told Fifth Judicial Circuit Court Judge Perryman. “I am finally accepting responsibility for something I have been running from for more than two years.”

Clampitt admitted to having years of issues with drugs.

“All these years I thought I was only hurting myself with my addiction,” Clampitt said. “The No. 1 thing I swore I would never do is let my addiction harm someone else. I now know I was hurting everyone who loved me – family, kids and ultimately Jimmy. I understand I have a penance to pay and I’m ready to do it. I lied in court. It was selfish but the only way I knew to survive another day. I am so sorry for the pain I have caused this family.”

Clampitt said the January 2017 wreck where Dugan was killed sent her into a spiral.

“Since the wreck, my life has been in a downward spiral more so than any of my 37 years of life, 20 of which as an addict,” Clampitt said. “It was a terrifying, never-ending nightmare.”

Cliff Williams is a staff writer for Tallapoosa Publishers.

Staff Writer

Cliff Williams is a staff writer for Tallapoosa Publishers.