Donnie Jones loads a printer into the pile of electronics dropped off to be recycled Thursday at the Alexander City Department of Public Works as part of a monthly e-recycling program. | David Goodwin
Donnie Jones loads a printer into the pile of electronics dropped off to be recycled Thursday at the Alexander City Department of Public Works as part of a monthly e-recycling program. | David Goodwin

Archived Story

City collects more than 3 tons of electronics to recycle

Published 10:39am Monday, September 16, 2013

More than three tons of electronics were kept out of landfills and garages Thursday as Alexander City held its first monthly electronics recycling event.
One trailer had already carted off more than 4,000 pounds of old televisions, obsolete computers, printers and other electronic devices, according to Donnie Jones of CE&E Solutions. Just after lunch Thursday, Jones stood in the shade next to another growing pile. His company helps a number of area cities’ residents get rid of unwanted electronics.
“After this, we’ll take it all back to separate out the different components and then send them to different companies to process even further,” he said.
The recycling events, which will be at the Alexander City Public Works Department on Railey Street from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on the second Thursday of each month, are more than a way to clean out the garage or junk room. They’re good for the environment, according to Sabrina Wood of the Middle Tallapoosa Clean Water Partnership.
“All electronics have chemicals and things that do not need to get into waterways,” she said. “By recycling them, they don’t take up space in landfills and there’s no chance of chemicals seeping out into the groundwater.”
Items accepted include desktop or laptop computers, computer mouse, keyboards, modems or routers, CDs and DVDs, power supplies, PC mix systems, home or cell phones, printers or copiers, mainframe servers, TVs, audio/video adapters, laptop chargers, cable boxes and nickel cadmium or lithium ion batteries.
There is a $10 fee to recycle televisions.
If requested, Jones said, he would “drill” a hard drive in front of the owner, to guarantee any personal information is no longer accessible.
“You can wipe a hard drive every day for a week, and still not have all the data off,” Jones said. “But if you drill it, no one is going to get anything off of it.”
Wood said she hopes the recycling events will prove popular enough that the program can be expanded to multiple days each month.

Editor's Picks

Kilgore ‘all aboard’ for holiday fun

  Rodney Kilgore has spent the last four years portraying popular railroad conductors. For most of the year, he wears striped overalls and goes to ... Read more

BRHS’ Fuller qualifies for USA Jr. Team

A Benjamin Russell Wildcat now represents the U.S.A for track and field. Read more