From left to right,  Renie Sikes, volunteer; Betty Daugherty, volunteer; Robert Ribolini, director of surgical services; and Steve Crowe, volunteer; stand in front of the new patient information board inside the recently renovated surgery waiting room at Russell Medical Center. | Austin Nelson
From left to right, Renie Sikes, volunteer; Betty Daugherty, volunteer; Robert Ribolini, director of surgical services; and Steve Crowe, volunteer; stand in front of the new patient information board inside the recently renovated surgery waiting room at Russell Medical Center. | Austin Nelson

Archived Story

Renovations to surgery waiting room keep families informed, at ease

Published 5:38pm Friday, August 16, 2013

Waiting on a loved one while they have surgery performed can be a very stressful situation. But at Russell Medical Center, recent additions and renovations of the surgery waiting room are making sure family members are as comfortable as possible.
“When people come in here, they are very anxious,” said Sarah Newman, coordinator of volunteer services. “It just helps to have a friendly face and something or someone to give them information (while they wait on their loved one).”
Volunteer services recently renovated the surgery waiting room, which was this year’s project, Newman said.
“We replaced the flooring, walls and put in new cabinets – just something to make people feel more comfortable,” Newman said.
The waiting room will also see the addition of bariatric chairs for larger hospital patrons.
While volunteer services handled the cosmetic renovations, Robert Ribolini, director of surgical services, said surgical services outfitted the waiting room with a new patient information board designed to keep loved ones in the know every step of the way.
The idea of the board is simple – family members receive a unique code once a patient registered, and the display shows this number along with the patient’s status.
“This gives the family idea of exactly where their loved ones are,” Ribolini said. “We want to make sure the know where their loved ones are and what stage there are in.”

The board displays not only what stage they are in, but it also logs the time that the patient entered that stage. The statuses range from into holding, into operating room, surgery in progress, procedure completed still in OR and in recovery room.
Ribolini said the patient information board is interconnected with the hospitals’ digital charting system. Doctors and nurses will see information on their screens similar to the families waiting, except with additional information that only medical personnel should be privy to. HIPPA privacy concerns must be adhered to, so the information board shows neither the name nor nature of the procedure.
But the high tech board is a supplement and Ribolini says face-to-face volunteers will not be eliminated and will still keep families informed should they have any questions.

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