Dadeville Public Library Director Abbigale Mangarelli, left, and interlibrary loan clerk Teri Wilson are gearing up for the library’s book sale April 6. Many shelves in the lower lower level of the library are double stacked, meaning plenty of choices for the public to purchase. Paperbacks cost 50 cents, hardbacks cost $1, and a bag of books is $5. | Alison James
Dadeville Public Library Director Abbigale Mangarelli, left, and interlibrary loan clerk Teri Wilson are gearing up for the library’s book sale April 6. Many shelves in the lower lower level of the library are double stacked, meaning plenty of choices for the public to purchase. Paperbacks cost 50 cents, hardbacks cost $1, and a bag of books is $5. | Alison James

Archived Story

Bookworms, take note

Published 12:56pm Thursday, March 28, 2013

Library plans biannual book sale for April 6

Library books are by definition free to borrow, but the Dadeville Public Library brings another dimension to reading and book distribution with its book sale, which is scheduled for April 6.

“Having the book sale on a specific day brings out a lot of people,” said library director Abbigale Mangarelli. “Just come down and enjoy. It’s going to be a lot of people socializing.”

Paperback books cost 50 cents, and hardback books cost $1. Mangarelli said people can also take advantage of the “bag of books” option, which allows patrons to fill a bag with as many books as possible for $5.

The sale will also feature baked goodies.

Teri Wilson, interlibrary loan clerk/assistant, said volunteers are helpful.

“I’ll bring my daughter up here and let her help,” Wilson said. “It gets busy – full of people. The parking lots will be full.”

Mangarelli said the majority of the books are donated – they are placed in the book sale typically because the library shelves already have a copy of the book.

Books for sale include a wide variety of genres: classics, poetry, health, food, military/war, art/decorating, holidays, crafts/hobbies, travel guides, animals, business management, self-help, inspiration, religion, Yearbooks published by the Opelika Daily News for 1964–1968, history, politics, biographies, children’s books, romance, remodeling, westerns, dictionaries, science fiction and more.

Mangarelli said the sale is the second largest fundraising effort for the Dadeville Public Library.  The sale is also open some days during the week, but Wilson said having a day set aside helps draw even more support from the public.

“It’s just a big sale like any store would have,” Wilson said.

Mangarelli said the sale is also seasonally appropriate.

“During the spring everybody is cleaning out,” Mangarelli said. “We’ve had five or six people already bring in bags or boxes of books.”

The sale will be open from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. April 6. Mangarelli said they hope to raise more than $400. The library is also accepting book donations for the sale.

In conjunction with the book sale, Patterson Technology Service will be holding an electronics recycling event outside in the parking lot.

“We’re trying to do what we can to protect the environment,” said Brad Patterson, co-owner.

Patterson said they can also boost their revenue by recycling items people typically throw away, and it keeps those items out of landfills.

Items that will be accepted include computers, laptops, cameras, copiers, wireless devices, printers, microwaves, fax machines, scanners, communication/electrical cords, stereo equipment, keyboards, computer mice, peripherals servers, VCRs, DVD players, typewriters, phone systems, cellphones, electronic games, UPS, modems, pagers, radios, camcorders, answering machines, power supplies, routers/hubs, LCD monitors and TVs and CRT monitors and TVs.

“I don’t think there’s enough going on in the county as far as electronics recycling goes,” Patterson said. “We’re hoping to do many more (recycling events) in the surrounding areas.”

Patterson said he hopes they will accumulate 5-10,000 pounds of electronics to recycle. They will not accept refrigerators, washers, dryers or light bulbs, and there will be a $10 charge for each CRT monitor.

Patterson said recycling these items is important for the environment.

“Most of your computer items don’t biodegrade very easily,” Patterson said. “It takes something like 15-20 years for a case to rust out.”

In addition, some electronics can leak acids into the soil.

“You end up with problems in your water sources and the surrounding lands that could persist for generations,” Patterson said.

The recycling event will take place April 5 from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. and April 6 from 8 a.m. until 1 p.m. Mangarelli said a portion of the money raised from recycling event will go back into the library.

To volunteer to help at the recycling event, call 256-825-7031. To volunteer to help at the book sale or find out more information call, 256-825-7820.

 

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