Archived Story

Jazz Fest exceptions

Published 12:28pm Wednesday, January 23, 2013

The city council unanimously approved waiving the $500 permit fee and business license requirements for food vendors at the 23rd annual Alexander City Jazz Fest.

The Jazz Fest is scheduled for June 7.

Also detailed in the agreement for the event permit were the following:

- the Jazz Fest secure $1,000,000 liability coverage for personal liability and property damage

- the Jazz Fest contract with the Alexander City Police Department to provide “adequate security” for the event

- Open consumption of alcohol will be allowed within the approved boundaries of the festival

Council members also unanimously voted for the calling of a public hearing for a rezoning request at 2500 Highway 280 near Rent-A-Center. The request, brought to the council by Donald E. Hinks, will be to discuss a change from the area’s current Planned Development designation to a B-2 designation.

“The guy wants to put kind of a strip mall out there across from Wal-Mart,” said District 1 Councilman Bobby Tapley.

The public hearing on the rezoning will be set for Feb. 18 at 5 p.m.

The council also:

- authorized Mayor Charles Shaw to dispose of an unneeded 1993 GMC aerial bucket truck, a 1997 Dura Patch street patcher and a 1993 GMC dump truck

- unanimously entered into a agreement with Community First National Bank for payment on the city’s new ladder truck

- voted to sponsor the 2013 Toyota Tundra Bassmaster Weekend Series, set to take place at Wind Creek State Park Feb. 2, for a fee of $1,500

- amended the capital budget to accommodate the purchase of two NuMetrics traffic data collectors for an amount not to exceed $4,500

In comments from council members during standing committee reports, District 4 Councilman Billy Ray Wall reminded citizens that the road work being done near the city’s post office and on Ala. Hwy. 63 near Central Alabama Community College are not city projects.

“Don’t call the city council or the mayor complaining about it because we’ve got no control over it,” Wall said. “What they’re doing is putting new asphalt down where they can put new sensors in for the lights. They said people have been complaining about the lights taking too long to change. But we have nothing to do with it – call the division office up on (U.S. Highway) 280.”

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